How to write the References

–References

References must be in the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) style (https://www.nlm.nih.gov/citingmedicine). They should be numbered in the order in which they appear in the text, and these numbers should be inserted as superscripts each time the author is cited (Smith¹ reported similar findings). Other references to the paper should be given in the same way after punctuation. (For example: other study has shown this to be true.² Jones et al.³ demonstrated…) At the end of the article the full list of references should give the names and initials of all authors unless there are more than six, in which case only the first three should be given followed by et al. The authors’ names are followed by the title of the article; the title of the journal abbreviated according to the style of Index Medicus; the year of publication; the volume number; and the first and last page numbers in full. Titles of books should be followed by the place of publication, the publisher, and the year. Authors are responsible for the accuracy and completeness of their references and correct text citations.

–Examples

Journal article
1. Chae YM, Yoo KB, Kim ES, Chae H. The adoption of electronic medical records and decision support systems in Korea. Healthc Inform Res 2011;17(3):172-7.
2. Vedel I, Lapointe L, Lussier MT, Richard C, Goudreau J, Lalonde L, et al. Healthcare professionals’ adoption and use of a clinical information system (CIS) in primary care: insights from the Da Vinci study. Int J Med Inform 2012;81(2):73-87.
Proceeding
3. Wolf KH, Marschollek M, Bott OJ, Howe J, Haux R. Sensors for health-related parameters and data fusion approaches. In: Hein A, Thoben W, Appelrath HJ, Jensch P, editors. Proceedings of the European Conference on eHealth; 2007 Oct 11-12; Oldenburg, Germany. p. 155-61.
Book
4. Wolter J, Dolan MW, Jacobs EB, Walker RA, Burrington-Brown J. The personal health record. Chicago (IL): American Health Information Management Association; 2009.
5. Lorenzi NM, Riley RT. Public health informatics and organizational change. In: O’Carroll PW, Yasnoff WA, Ward ME, Ripp LH, Martin EL, Ross DA, et al. Public health informatics and information system. New York (NY): Springer-Verlag; 2010. p. 179-98.
Website
6. WHO. WHO statistical information system [Internet]. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO; c2011 [cited at 2011 Dec 20]. Available from: http://www.who.int/whosis/en/menu.cfm.
Others
7. International Organization for Standardization. Health informatics: quality criteria and methodology for detailed clinical methods. Geneva, Switzerland: International Organization for Standardization; 2009. (ISO/CEN/Working Draft 13972)
8. Min JH. The study of security measures of threat on mobile internet environment [dissertation]. Seoul, Korea: Konkuk University; 2010.
9. Hunter MG, Robertson PW, Post JJ. Significance of isolated reactive treponemal chemiluminescence immunoassay results. J Infect Dis 2012 Aug 6 [Epub]. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jis459.