Manuscript format and structure

–Language

    The language of publication is English or Thai. It is preferred that English manuscripts are professionally edited.

 

–Manuscript Preparation

    The text should be double-spaced throughout and with a minimum of 3cm for left and right hand margins and 5cm at head and foot. Text should be standard 12 point for English manuscript, and 14 point for Thai manuscript.

 

–Title and Authors Page

  • –Title must be descriptive and concise.
  • –Provide authors’ name and full contact details for the corresponding author including email, mailing address and telephone numbers. Academic affiliations are required for all co-authors. These details should be presented separately to the main text of the article to facilitate anonymous peer review.
  • –Acknowledgments
  • –Conflict of interest

 

–References

    References must be in the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) style (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/uniform_requirements.html). They should be numbered in the order in which they appear in the text, and these numbers should be inserted as superscripts each time the author is cited (Smith¹ reported similar findings). Other references to the paper should be given in the same way after punctuation. (For example: other study has shown this to be true.² Jones et al.³ demonstrated…) At the end of the article the full list of references should give the names and initials of all authors unless there are more than six, in which case only the first three should be given followed by et al. The authors’ names are followed by the title of the article; the title of the journal abbreviated according to the style of Index Medicus; the year of publication; the volume number; and the first and last page numbers in full. Titles of books should be followed by the place of publication, the publisher, and the year.

 

–Examples

    –Book

      –1. Huff D. How to lie with statistics. 4th ed. London: Penguin, 1991, p.51.

    Chapter in book

      –1. Huff D and Black TL. Comprehensive statistics. In: Miller C and Smith H (eds) How to lie with statistics. 4th ed. London: Penguin, 1991, pp.51–55.

    –Journal article

      –1. Ludbrook J, Miller T and Russel A. Musculovenous pumps in the human lower limb. Am Heart J 1966; 71: 635–641.

      –2. Araki C, Black TL, Patberg FT, et al. Significance of calf muscle pump function in venous ulceration. J Vasc Surg 1994; 20: 872–879.

    Journal article published ahead of print

      1. Ludbrook J. Musculovenous pumps in the human lower limb. Am Heart J. Epub ahead of print 12 June 2011. DOI: 10.1177/09544327167940.

    Website

      1. Smith JR. Choosing your reference style. Online Referencing 2(3), http://orj.sagepub.com (2003, accessed 12 October 2008).

    Conference paper

      1. Peters J. Musculovenous pumps in the human lower limb. In: ASME conference on automatic transmissions (ed A O’Brien), Pisa, Italy, 29 May–2 June 2003, paper no. GE1234, pp.4–10. New York: ASME.

    Thesis/dissertation

      1. Clark JM. Referencing style for journals. PhD Thesis, University of Leicester, UK, 2002.

    Patent and patent applications

      1. Smith ST. Referencing styles for journals – a new method. Patent 12346-ZH, USA, 2011.

    Newspaper/magazine

      1. Clark JM. Referencing style for journals. The Independent, 21 May 2006, p.10.

    Manual

      –1. Fiat. Driver’s manual, Fiat Uno 4-litre diesel model, December 2010.

    Standard

      1. ISO 27799:2008. Information security management in health.